Text Bibles

Text Bibles reprints of ancient versions, but are made in a word processor. Every effort is made to ensure that these are kept in original spelling. These bibles will not look exactly the same, nor will they be laid out on the page the same as the original. However, using modern typesetting makes for a clearer, more readable text.

2. Middle English Bibles

Terence Noble. Wycliffe New Testament (Modern Spelling Edition). 1390. This is the New Testament of Terence Noble's modern spelling update of the Wycliffe Bible of the 14th century. From the back cover:
      With the spelling up-dated and many obsolete words replaced, the document you now hold in your hands is a fair and accurate representation of John Wycliffe's and John Purvey's 14th century translation of the very first English vernacular New Testament. This is their New Testament with modern spelling – not some 21st century variation on a medieval theme. The melodies and harmonies are distinctly Wycliffe's and Purvey's. Only now, they are sung with words that we can all understand. Six centuries later, you can now read what those common folk were themselves at long last able to read (or, more likely, have read to them). Simple, direct words, with their own charm and rhythm, their own humble, cogent beauty. Sophisticated and graceful words, their originality and newness making the well-known and fondly remembered fresh, alive, and interesting once again. All because Wycliffe, Purvey, and their compeers cared so deeply and sacrificed so dearly. This is an 8.5x11 volume, available in hardback 664pp $44.00, paperback 664pp $30.00. Click here for a sample page.
Terence Noble. Wycliffe-KJV Parallel New Testament (Modern Spelling Edition). 1390. This is the New Testament of Terence Noble's modern spelling update of the Wycliffe Bible of the 14th century. This is the Wycliffe-KJV parallel Edition (two volumes). From the back cover: With the spelling up-dated and many obsolete words replaced, this Bible is a fair and accurate representation of John Wycliffe’s and John Purvey’s 14th century translation of the very first English vernacular New Testament. This is their New Testament with modern spelling – not some 21st century variation on a medieval theme. Six centuries later, you can now read what those common folk were themselves at long last able to read (or, more likely, have read to them). Simple, direct words, with their own charm and rhythm, their own humble, cogent beauty. Sophisticated and graceful words, their originality and newness making the well-known and fondly remembered fresh, alive, and interesting once again. This is an 8.5x11 volume, available in hardback (volume 1) 506pp $38.00, hardback (volume 2) 615pp $38.00, paperback (volume 1) 506pp $27.00, paperback (volume 2) 615pp $27.00. Click here for a sample page.
Wycliffe Bible. 1395. John Wycliffe is credited as the first to translate the Bible into English. Nicholas Hereford is known to have translated much of the Old Testament. John Purvey, one of Wycliffe's associates, produced a revised version of Wycliffe's Bible in 1388. Demand was high, but since these Bibles had to be copied by hand it was difficult to keep up. The Wycliffe Bible is difficult for us to read today as it is written in "Middle English." This is an 8.5x11 volume, available in hardback 693pp $45.00, paperback 693pp $32.00. Click here for a sample page.

3. Pre-1611 Bibles

Tyndale Bible. 1534. William Tyndale first began printing the New Testament in Cologne in 1525. However, he was soon stopped from continuing and had to flee to Worms. The 1525 printing is known as the "Cologne Fragment" or "Cologne Quarto." He finished printing a full new testament in 1526. By 1534 he had published the five books of the Pentateuch as well. His was the first English New Testament printed on a printing press. So opposed was the church to the Bible in English that Tyndale was eventually caught and executed. However, even while in prison he continued to translate portions of the Bible. This is a text reprint of his Pentateuch, Jonah and the New Testament in original spelling. This is a 6x9 volume, available in dustcover 635pp $42.00, hardback 635pp $42.00, paperback 635pp $30.00. Click here for a sample page.
Coverdale Bible. 1535. Myles Coverdale was the first to publish a complete English Bible. Coverdale's work was based on the Zurich Bible of Zwingli, the Vulgate, the Latin text of Paginius, Martin Luther's Bible and Tyndale's New Testament. This was the first Bible to introduce chapter summaries instead of just chapter headings. This is an 8.5x11 volume, available in hardback 687pp $44.00, paperback 687pp $33.00. Click here for a sample page.
Great Bible. 1540. Essentially a revision of the Matthew Bible, this Bible got its name from its large size. It had several other names: The Cranmer Bible (he wrote the preface), Cromwell Bible (he did the most to prepare for its publication), Whitechurch Bible (he printed several editions), and the Chained Bible (it was chained to pulpits ). Coverdale worked on this Bible as well, but this version is not known by his name. This is an 8.5x11 volume, available in hardback 682pp $45.00, paperback 682pp $34.00. Click here for a sample page.
Bishops' Bible. 1568. This version was created by Matthew Parker and other bishops (hence the name). While the Geneva Bible was a superior translation, it's study notes made it unacceptable for use by the Church of England. This Bible is a revision of the Great Bible. This would be the last version before the Authorised* Version (AV) of 1611. Some refer to it as the rough draft for the AV. This is also considered the second "authorised" version. This is an 8.5x11 volume, available in hardback 640pp $44.00, paperback 640pp $32.00. Click here for a sample page.
Geneva Bible. 1587. This is a later edition of the Geneva Bible of 1560. It is the 1587 revision of the original 1560. This is an 8.5x11 volume, available in hardback 698pp $45.00, paperback 698pp $32.00. Click here for a sample page.

4. 1611 to 1901 Bibles

Authorised Version. 1611. In 1611, King James wanted a new translation of the Scriptures. While his reasons were not holy at all, the work done on this translation was quite good. No book has been reprinted more than this translation and its revisions. Take a careful look, though, at the spellings and uses of the words. It is NOT the same as the "King James Version" we are familiar with. Our King James Bibles are really a 1769 (or later) revision of this original work. This is an 8.5x11 volume, available in hardback 728pp $45.00, paperback 728pp $33.00. Click here for a sample page.
John Wesley NT. 1755. John Wesley translated this work when a debilitating illness prevented him from travelling and preaching. He wanted to create a New Testament that people could understand. The English of the KJV was no longer that commonly spoken. He "examined minutely every word of the New Testament in the original Greek" to create his translation. Though done during this illness during which he expected he might die, this work was really the culmination of 25 years of study begun in 1729. This is a 6x9 volume, available in hardback 479pp $36.00, paperback 479pp $24.00. Click here for a sample page.
Noah Webster Bible. 1833. Noah Webster, best known for his English language dictionary, also produced his own modern English translation of the Bible. While his was an excellent and highly accurate translation, it did not gain wide usage due to the popularity of the King James Bible. This is an 8.5x11 volume, available in hardback 628pp $44.00, paperback 628pp $31.00. Click here for a sample page.
Isaac Leeser OT. 1853. Leeser took 17 years to complete his translation. This was the standard American Jewish Bible until the Jewish Publication Society's work in 1917. This is an 8.5x11 volume, available in hardback 689pp $45.00, paperback 689pp $33.00. Click here for a sample page.
Alexander Campbell's Acts. 1858. This translation of Acts was later included in the American Bible Union New Testament. This volume was produced to aid scholars of the American Reformation movement. This is a 6x9 volume, available in hardback 54pp $21.00, paperback 54pp $8.00. Click here for a sample page.
Holy Bible - American Standard Version. 1901. This is a text (done in a word processor) reprint of the American Standard Version of the Holy Bible (1901). This is an 8.5x11 volume, available in hardback 734pp $46.00, paperback 734pp $33.00. Click here for a sample page.

Novelty Items

Gospels for Hackers. 2006. This is a humorous, yet actually readable triglot of the four Gospels. Every word of the King James Version has been transliterated into three forms of "elite speech." This "l33T sP33K" is in three levels - lite, medium and hard. Read things like "7H3N j053pH B3!n6 R@!53d fR0m 5133P d!d @5 7H3 @n631 0f 7H3 10Rd H@D B!DD3N h!m." Whether it is for a gag gift for that "techie" on your list or as a sneaky form of evangelism for a programmer you know, you'll enjoy this truly unusual Bible. This is an 8.5x11 volume, available in paperback 660pp $25.00. Click here for a sample page.